Addressing hitch binding with the Rope Wrench on descent

TimBr

Well-Known Member
It would have a hard time working it's way out Tim, but even if it did there would not really be a problem per say. The RW is not really the life support, the hitch underneath it is. The hitch would bind up tight and might be rough to descend on but that it why we carry 8's or use munters.
Right. Which differentiates it from the Hitch Hiker, if I'm thinking correctly. I just don't like dropping small parts and having to find them again, not that that seems likely with ClimbHy's setup.

I guess that is another major strength of the Rope Wrench; that it allows climbers to operate the same way on a single line as they used to on a doubled line, with regard to being able to use a hitch, and also still being dependent on it for life support.

The idea of the Rope Wrench was absolutely a stroke of genius.

Tim
 
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TimBr

Well-Known Member
@Drewtree started a really great thread that relates directly to the main issue of this thread. Because of the number of responses and the specificity of the answers he is likely to get, he was right to do it in an entirely separate thread. Well worth reading.

Here is my attempt at posting a link to that other thread, which has the title "Rope Wrench-Hitch/Rope compendium".

http://www.treebuzz.com/forum/threads/rope-wrench-hitch-rope-compendium.33714/

Thanks.

Tim
 

pdj317

Active Member
I didn't see this discussed so if it has been forgive me but I always carry an ATC on my secondary bridge and for a long descent I can completely collapse the hitch(Michocan) and modulate my descent speed with the descender. It isn't much extra to carry and if should something happen with the Wrench you still have a way to descend.
 

Brocky

Well-Known Member
2nd the use of a tubular belay device. I like the kind that has the v-grooves as it allows you to hold your weight easier. I use the ATC Sport that has just one slot, it's fast and easy with no tangling. They save a lot of wear on the hitch cord.
 
Maybe a stupid question, but I'm a newbie climber and finding that my 30" eye&eye may be too long, as it gets jammed and bound up in the RW, which at times is causing my line to lock up. Should I switch to a 28"eye&eye, or is this something that'll correct itself when I eventually acquire a better climbing technique? This happened as I was using a neck attachment to the RW, for tending, along with a foot and knee ascender. My climbing lines are Sterling HTP 11mm, and Samson Predator 11mm.

Seems unfortunate how the Eye&eye sampler pack I bought from Wesspur were all 30" in length. I don't have any shorter eye&eye cords to try, at the moment, and I'm hoping to avoid more unnecessary gear expenditures.
 

moss

Well-Known Member
Maybe a stupid question, but I'm a newbie climber and finding that my 30" eye&eye may be too long, as it gets jammed and bound up in the RW, which at times is causing my line to lock up. Should I switch to a 28"eye&eye, or is this something that'll correct itself when I eventually acquire a better climbing technique? This happened as I was using a neck attachment to the RW, for tending, along with a foot and knee ascender. My climbing lines are Sterling HTP 11mm, and Samson Predator 11mm.

Seems unfortunate how the Eye&eye sampler pack I bought from Wesspur were all 30" in length. I don't have any shorter eye&eye cords to try, at the moment, and I'm hoping to avoid more unnecessary gear expenditures.
What hitch are you using?
-AJ
 

pdj317

Active Member
I was climbing the other day on All gear Rocket with a 8mm Oceans eye to eye 5/1 Michocan ran very smooth.(probably 185-190 pounds all saddled up)
 

moss

Well-Known Member
How long is the eyetoeye? I'm finding
the 30" is too long.
VT is better for DdRT, not so good with the Rope Wrench. You can make a 30" eye-2-work, it's a matter finding the right number of coils etc. Try the Michoan, Cooper's Hitch, others will have more hitches to suggest. Keep fiddling with the hitch configuration, you'll get it.
-AJ
 

WaitakKauri

Well-Known Member
VT, and I'm 6'1, 200lbs.
I'm 6'2, 185lbs/80kg without gear climbing on 11mm Yale Kernmantle. I'd try the michoacan with 5 wraps with 10mm. Works great for me with 10mm beeline doublefishermans 27" eye to eye. It's really compact so I suspect it'd still be good for you with longer legs.
 

TimBr

Well-Known Member
Maybe a stupid question, but I'm a newbie climber and finding that my 30" eye&eye may be too long, as it gets jammed and bound up in the RW, which at times is causing my line to lock up. Should I switch to a 28"eye&eye, or is this something that'll correct itself when I eventually acquire a better climbing technique? This happened as I was using a neck attachment to the RW, for tending, along with a foot and knee ascender. My climbing lines are Sterling HTP 11mm, and Samson Predator 11mm.

Seems unfortunate how the Eye&eye sampler pack I bought from Wesspur were all 30" in length. I don't have any shorter eye&eye cords to try, at the moment, and I'm hoping to avoid more unnecessary gear expenditures.
Climbing SRT, you probably don't have to worry about termination knots interfering with your climbing system the way you do climbing DdRT. Learning to tie the double fisherman's knot, I think it's called, would allow you to buy the unspliced hitch cord much more cheaply than paying for spliced eyes every time. It also allows you to adjust the length of the working part of your hitch cord to exactly the length you want. Go on one of the online climbing gear retailer's websites and look at how cheap the hitch cord is per foot, to see the difference it will make to your wallet.

The next step, (which I haven't taken myself yet) is to learn to splice your own cordage. There's a whole section of this forum devoted to that stuff.

Tim
 
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